Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Lisbon Cathedral (II)

One of Lisbon's problems when it comes to restoring old constructions or building new ones at downown is the fact that history is, literally, by levels...
This is a cloister patio added to the Cathedral in the 14th century, built over a recently discovered roman village.
Keep in mind Lisbon was destroyed by a big earthquake in 1755, which makes every work even harder. You never know what you will find when you start digging!... :-)

One of many tombs displayed inside the main church and the cloister area. (Click on the 1st photo to enlarge)

24 comments:

m_m said...

Very impressive, especially the first photo is really stunning! Digging there must be very exciting!:)

Peter said...

Rather common in many French cities also (even without eartquakes). It often make things complicated: When you start digging for a new construction you will find some old Roman traces and then you may not be allowed to build, ever, or only after several years! Frustrating for the people involved, but necessary!

Joan Elizabeth said...

The amount of history there is in Europe cities both fascinates and overwhelms me.

Pagan Sphinx said...

I love the cloister areas of cathedrals. I believed I have visited this one on one of my trips to Lisbon, but I'm not sure now. With digital photography it is now so much easier to keep track of one's travels. I'm visiting Portugal and Spain this summer. Barcelona for the first time!

Great captures.

Jacob said...

Amazing, isn't it? Lisbon sounds much like Rome...every time they start digging they find some ancient building or statue or ?

That first photo is just splendid, JM!

brattcat said...

Are you able to get close to the site or was this done with a zoom? Fantastic shots.

Cezar and Léia said...

Eu acho que o principal responsável por essa reconstrução de Lisboa foi o Marques de Pombal, isso é correto?!

Lindo post! Obrigada por essas lindas fotos e pelas informações!
Abraços do Brasil
Léia :-)

(*** aqui depois dessa reforma ortográfica,que ocorreu na virada do ano, me perdoe os erros em nosso Português, pois ainda estou confusa...preciso de aulas para reciclar minha ortografia!!!!Nunca sei o que é certo realmente!)

Hilda said...

That is so fascinating! Lisbon sounds like heaven for archeologists and history buffs.

About your first photo: they didn't continue the restoration of the cloister, I'm sure. The ramps are for visitors?

The tomb sculpture is so sweet. I don't suppose the dog was buried with him?

Jarart said...

"Intrigue" is the word that comes to mind. Fantastic pictures.

glduro_marieloupe said...

JM, we have an ancestral in one of the tombs inside the main church at Lisbon. I dont remember her name (yes, its a great-great-great greatmother...) Perhaps her name was Lopo...

marieloupe

That is the chicken said...

Fascinating shot of the excavations. Is this an ongoing excavation or is it one that's preserved and now open to the public? You certainly got a good view!

gogouci said...

14th century!!! I live in a state that just celebrated its 150th birthday. Incredible that this structure has remained for so long.

Babzy said...

Impressive !

joo said...

It's stunning! I think that it's theproblem of many places which were developing over the centuries.

B Squared said...

Must be quite a debate as to what gets preserved, restored, or removed.

Lois said...

It sounds like a difficult job, but fascinating at the same time!

JM said...

Hilda and Brattcat,
You can walk around the cloisters and on the ramps/pathways above the roman village. No zoom needed here.

Prospero said...

I can fully appreciate the work and dedication it must take to maintain centuries of history in your city. That tomb is wonderful.

Small City Scenes said...

How interesting and amazing.

On a much newer note--even Seattle Wa. in the US is built on top of part of the city that burned in the 1890s. they have underground tours. Also interesting but not as impressive as old Roman ruins. MB

cieldequimper said...

Superb archeological shot. I just love it when I read that a medieval cemetary was discovered on a building site in the middle of one of our cities. I'm also kind of sad because in a way it is disturbing the final resting place of people who will stay put under... a garage for instance. Great work, JM!

Asta said...

Hi JM,

Wonderful pictures and in particular the picture of the tomb is astonishing. What sort of stone is it made of?

I had no idea that Lisbon had experienced such a devestating earthquake.......

Best regards
Asta

Dina said...

Ooh, I love this kind of stuff!

D said...

Wow, this is very interesting. I particularly like the dog resting froever at his master's feet.
Thank you for your recent visit and comment at my blog!

humanobserver said...

nice