Friday, December 30, 2011

Another Tiled Building


Lisbon, 1864
(Sorry about the tram cables)

27 comments:

Arija said...

You do have some lovely buildings in Lisbon. I am sorry we did not get to Portugal on our European travels.

I wish you a wonderful New Year ahead with many splendid adventures!

Kate said...

All the tiles you show on various buildings and objects makes me want to learn more about the origin and history of tiles in your country!

Clytie said...

What a beautiful building - it took an amazing artist to create this with tiles! We have nothing around here that comes close to this.

I especially love the scrollwork on the iron balcony fences.

I'm looking forward to another wonderful year of photos and history, JM! I hope your New Years celebrations are safe and happy!

Dorian Susan said...

Cool building. I can't tell if the figures are carvings or paintings. Based on time period...lots of embellishment and copy of "the classics". Don't mind the train cables at all. Can't stop progress, Right? Happy New Year

Olivier said...

les peintures murales sont tres belles.
HAPPY NEW YEAR

Sylvia K said...

I do love the colorful tiled buildings you've shared with us, JM! I guess we all find ourselves apologizing for "wires" these days! It's still a terrific capture!

Sylvia

Margaret said...

At first glance, I would have thought the images were carved. I do love the Portuguese tiles!

Gine said...

C'est la grâce pure ! Les coloris sont parfaits pour évoquer la nostalgie ...

joo said...

Another great one, JM!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

They really are beautiful buildings JM and exactly what I think of when imagining Portugal! Here's wishing you a very happy New Year.

cieldequimper said...

I think this is going to be one of my favourites. I love the muted tones!

Sharon said...

Another beautiful example of art and craftsmanship.

Andrew said...

A wonderful old building to see JM

RedPat said...

Fabulous work! Thanks for showing it to us!

jennyfreckles said...

Never mind the cables - one's eye gets drawn past them to the wonderful facade.

Lowell said...

I just wish we had some tram cables to get in the way of our photographs. That would be a small price to pay for better public transportation!

This is, indeed, a lovely old building that could no doubt do with a bit of renovation. Your reputation re tile remains intact!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

How beautiful (and the cables, which I wouldn't have noticed had you not mentioned them, just point out that this is a great, big city with good public transportation -- something I would give anything to have in either of the places where we usually hang out!) Happy New Year!

CameraCruise said...

Beautiful building!
Happy New Year!

Gunn said...

Wooooooooow!

FaNtAsTiC !!

Jack said...

Quite a place, JM.

crocrodyl said...

Wonderful building! Great work! Happy New Year!

ladyfi said...

Beautiful!

Joan Elizabeth said...

Another great building. Happy New Year, Jose.

Carolina Tavares said...

Linda arquitetura. De fato os cabos elétricos acabam com a estética do monumento e consequentemente da fotografia. Será que alguém pensa nisso?

Um Ano Novo feliz para ti, repleto de fotos incríveis, como as que postas aqui e que muito aprecio.

VP said...

Wonderful, I hope they keep it that way.

Francisca said...

Very unique. I wonder about the minds who dream up this of grand design for buildings. The tram cables you have here are nowhere near as unsightly as the power/phone lines that mar the urbanscape in most developing countries. In Bucharest, for instance, they are totally in your face and it's impossible to shoot around them.

Stickup Artist said...

At first, I thought those were painted directly on the building. I guess the tiles hold up better thru the centuries. Of course, I have seen decorative tiles before, but nothing like these, and applied directly on a building! The decorative iron work on the balconies is also wonderful. It's a shame these type of arts are vanishing. Seems it would be a great way to employ a lot of people and beautify our cities.