Friday, August 8, 2008

Blooming agaves

As many other non-native plants, agaves were brought from the Americas by portuguese navigators, five centuries ago (Discoveries Age).
They adapted quite well and, at least three species are now spread everywhere from central to southern Portugal, the hottest half of the country. On the facing south 'Costa do Sol' (Sunny Coast) where I live, they look really charming on top of the cliffs above the ocean.

14 comments:

PJ said...

You really had me fooled on the first one. I couldn't figure out what kind of tree that was. the colors in your photos are scrumptious.

Baruch said...

Stunning pictures & beautiful views

Mary Jo said...

Quando olhei para a arvore pensei realmente que j+a a teria visto numa foto de um blog americano. Tenho de reparar melhor a próxima vez que +assar na marginal.

Jilly said...

Just looked back and your photographs are just lovely. I love these agaves. We have them here but not is such a stunning setting. Beautiful.

Denton said...

Beautiful photos and welcome to the City Daily Photo community.

Denton from Greenville and the Daily Photo Map.

Neva said...

your sky is soooo blue in this photo! I am not familiar with this plant....oopps thats right...if it is not a weed, I would not recognize it!!haha...nice shot.

babooshka said...

Blue sky, lovely beach, and plants we just don't have here. Superb photography.

Thiên said...

We have these in South Texas as well. Around here, many people call them "Century Plants" or "Century Cactus."

Sailor Girl said...

These trees have accompanied me through all my life! I LOVE THEM!!!!!

J. said...

When I went to Portugal I was wondering what kind of trees they are. Now I know, thanks:)

JM said...

Thank you all for the nice comments.

J, glad the mistery is solved... :-)

Sterl the Pearl's Daily Pics of Boulder said...

striking pic! never knew agave until now- I hear the agave nectar is yummy. Good pic!!!!

Bhavesh Chhatbar said...

Really wonderful to know their adaptation. I've heard that not all the plants adapt this easily; the Brazil-nut trees don't reproduce outside the thick Amazon forest.

Z said...

Wow, I had no idea that this was sort of their 'swan song' so to speak (I came back here from your other post).