Thursday, December 20, 2012

Decay (LXXIV)


Former beach bar at Parede built in 1959 and destroyed by the ocean in the 1980's.
Every winter parts of the building are washed away.

21 comments:

EG CameraGirl said...

It makes a wonderful frame for the photo.

Olivier said...

le cadre naturel est magnifique, il met bien en valeur le centre de la photo

ladyfi said...

Wonderful framing!

Sharon said...

Sounds like it might have been built a little to close to the sea. It makes a nice photo frame now.

cieldequimper said...

You'll be able to show us the progress! Wonderful photo!

Sylvia K said...

A wonderful frame indeed and a beautiful picture! Never thought that I would get so much pleasure fro "decay", JM!! I do so enjoy this series!! Enjoy your weekend!!

RedPat said...

A wonderful shot!!

Karl Demetz said...

Fantastic framed picture, I love it!

JM said...

@Sharon: The water is rising, that's the problem and this kind of destruction has been happening in many places of our coast on the last decades, not only on beach bars and restaurants, but also on fishermen houses.

VP said...

Nice view, ruins apart...

JM said...

P.S. And cliffs are falling as never before.

TexWisGirl said...

beautiful shot, though.

LOLfromPasa said...

Well spotted! And beautifully photographed.

Stickup Artist said...

Great concept! Reminds me of a Rene Magritte painting...

Randy said...

It did make for a nice shot.

Bob Crowe said...

All things must pass. Second Law of Thermodynamics. Heat death of the universe. Might as well go pour another glass of wine.

Kate said...

Oh, I like the composition very much. Lovely framing!

Duncan D. Horne - the Kuantan blogger said...

This foreground silhouette cuts such lovely jagged lines!
Duncan In Kuantan

Leslie D. said...

Great photo and interesting about water rising. There are several houses perched directly over the water where I live and I wonder if it's just a matter of time..

Joan Elizabeth said...

ooo this is a different one for your decay series.

tapirgal said...

Looks like a few places around here, but here it is mostly for economic reasons, I think.